Male Ape Fight

How Darwin Discovered Evolution

Today the theory of evolution is a complex body of theory supported by other branches of science. In other words, we do not need the theory of evolution to know that evolution is a fact. However, in the mid-nineteenth century, the world was different.
Evolution Theory

Evolutionary Theory

Evolution theory, also known as evolutionary theory, or the theory of evolution, is based on the idea that all life on earth is related and gradually changes over time. The theory primarily explains the ongoing speciation of life since its emergence on Earth.
Theory

Is Evolution Just a Theory?

English scientist Charles Darwin introduced the theory of evolution through natural selection in 1859 with the publication of his book "On the Origin of Species". This started a fierce argument among nineteenth-century scientists but the massive evidence coming from various other branches of science established evolution's truth beyond a reasonable doubt before the twentieth century.
Polar Bears

Are All of Our Characteristics Evolutionary Adaptations?

Natural selection says only the fit will surprise. The fit are those that have the inherited traits that help them best adapt to their habitat so that they live long enough to have and raise their offspring. Does this mean all of the inheritable traits of organisms ultimately serve one purpose: improve the adaptation of the organisms to their environments?
Bonobo

If We Evolved from Monkeys Why Are There Still Monkeys?

After the publication of "On the Origin of Species" by Charles Darwin, Evolution through natural selection was rather quickly adopted by scientists. However, in its infancy scientists imagined evolution as linear and progressive. The early expectation in scientific communities was that modern humans evolved from existing ape populations gradually and that there had to be fossil evidence that links humans to apes.

Who Was Charles Darwin?

Charles Darwin is the first human who made people aware of their place in the evolutionary process, which directly or indirectly helped develop many scientific and humanist ideas